Marketing in the Arts Part Two

Though many don’t think so, art and business go hand-in-hand

 

 

I have recently finished up a project doing social media for a theatre company. My main tasks were to keep their Twitter account up to date and make promotional videos for their upcoming shows.

I’ve learned a handful of things from this project. I am assuming quite a few of people viewing this work in the arts in one way or another, and I thought I’d share some of what I found with you. Please remember, this is what I have learned. Your experiences and insights might differ from what I am about to share.

  1. Get away from text.

This is pretty obvious, I know. But it deserves to be said. Art, for the most part, is a visual and auditory medium. Actually, not even for the most part. It is purely a visual and auditory medium. Even novels, though they are pure text, paint a “picture” in your head. Use this. Don’t tell about the pop-up gallery you have going on, show it. Pictures, videos, sound even. And if you must use text, which I’m not sure why you would be limited to just text in this day and age, make sure it tells some kind of story. Describe what you are doing. Tell the story of the tour you are on right now. Make it interesting.

I made a series of promotional videos for the shows my department was putting on, and they all (well, the two that I made) surpassed 8000 impressions and 500 views in the first five days. Sharing visual content is crucial in all fields, but especially in the arts.

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